TODAY IN KENTUCKY HISTORY

Thank You For Visiting

Localtonians wishes a Happy Birthday to Lucy (Virgin) Downs, thought to be the first white child born west of the Allegheny Mountains.  She was born in what is now Fayette County, Pennsylvania, in 1769.  In 1790 the family moved to Maysville.  She relocated with a brother to Cincinnati in 1792 and was married there in 1800, to John Downs.  She died in 1847 and was buried in Oldtown near the Little Sandy River in Greenup County, where she had resided for forty years.

September 17, 1862, a clash occurred between Union and Confederate forces on the streets of Florence.  The Confederates were moving north from Lexington.

Localtonians wishes a Happy Birthday to Eddyville native Forrest Carlisle Pogue, born in 1912.  Mr. Pogue was a historian best known as the biographer of General George C. Marshall.

September 17, 1939, Night Policeman Roscoe Halcomb, Cumberland Police Department, was shot and killed while attempting to arrest a hitchhiker who had threatened a motorist with a handgun. 

September 17, 1942, Kentucky newspapers announced a campaign from October 12 to 31 to help raise 284,562,700 pounds of scrap metal to donate for the war.

September 17, 1950, Army PFC Kenneth H. Murphy from Casey County died while fighting in the Korean War.

September 17, 1953, the good-natured Governor Weatherby donned green and white racing silks and a jockey cap and climbed into a sulky to guide the ostrich Calamity to victory.  The 7,000 spectators in the grand stand at the Kentucky State Fair loved every minute of the unscheduled event.  

Localtonians wishes a Happy Birthday to Louisville native Jim Cornette, born in 1961.  Jim’s fascination with wrestling began when he was a child; by his early teens, he was working as an announcer for live wrestling matches.  He owned Smoky Mountain Wrestling during the 1990s and worked for World Wrestling Entertainment and World Championship Wrestling.

September 17, 1967, Navy P03 Joseph Anthony Coomes from Owensboro, died fighting in the Vietnam War.  

September 17, 1968, Marine 1LT Stanley Garfield Lawson from Shelbyville, died fighting in the Vietnam War.

September 17, 1970, a 12-year-old boy, believed to be one of the youngest persons ever charged with a capital murder offense in Kentucky, was cleared of a murder charge in Trigg Circuit court.  The shooting was ruled accidental.

September 17, 1975, Jailer Jessie Keen Frost, Allen County Detention Center, succumbed to injuries sustained on August 3rd, when he was beaten by an inmate.  Jailer Frost had entered the jail cell to server supper when one of the inmates pushed the food car causing the food to spill.  The inmate then attacked Jailer Frost after he slipped on the spilled food.

September 17, 1987, local citizens buried the Shelbyville U.S. Constitutional Bicentennial time capsule to commemorate the 1787 U.S. Constitution.  

4b5fc9a8 9953 41ad 9b59 92f511016026

September 17, 1994, five go to post for the Grade I Ruffian Stakes at Belmont Park.  Four are Keeneland graduates.  The entries included; Sky Beauty, Dispute, Educated Risk, Link River and You’d be Surprised.

September 17, 2004, Governor Ernie Fletcher called a special legislative session so lawmakers could resolve the “crisis” over the rising cost of healthcare, for public employees and teachers.

September 17, 2005, director Cameron Crowe signed autographs at Freeman Lake in the morning.  Later, he signed more, outside the Elizabethtown Movie Palace, before screening his new film, Elizabethtown.

September 17, 2011, Louisville beats Kentucky in Lexington 24-17 to win the 24th Governor’s Cup.  It was the 3rd game of the season for both teams and a match between Joker Phillips and Charlie Strong.  Louisville goes on to lose in the Belk Bowl against NC State with a young Teddy Bridgewater.  The series stood at 14-10, favor Kentucky.

September 17, 2016, an 1852 gold medal honoring Henry Clay sold for $346,000 at a Dallas auction; more than quadruple the required bid of $75,000.  The one-of-a-kind 30 ounce California gold had a portrait of Clay on it and came with an engraved silver case with a picture of his Ashland Estate.  Henry “Hank” Clay Anderson List, a fourth-generation grandson of Clay who lives in Lexington, consigned the piece.

September 17, 2016, a Kentucky bred wins Woodbine’s GI $1,040,000 Woodbine Mile for three-year-olds and upward.

September 17, 2017, Helen Bates “Penny” Chenery died.

September 17, 2020, Governor A. Beshear’s office made arguments before the Kentucky Supreme Court to convince the justices his coronavirus mandates were constitutional.  Meanwhile, Fayette County announced six locations for in-person voting for the November election.