Kentucky County Timeline

June 30, 1780, the Virginia Assembly divided Kentucky County into Jefferson County, Fayette County and Lincoln County.  The new counties all became effective on November 1, 1780. 

Kentucky County Virginia 1780

At the time, the territory was home to five established communities: Boonesborough, Fort Harrod/Boiling Springs, St. Asaph, later called Logan’s Station, McClelland’s Station and Leestown

KY 1792

June 22, 1792, Scott County and Washington County are the first counties created by the new Commonwealth of Kentucky.

 

Washington County was created from Nelson County and was named in honor of President George Washington.  Springfield is the county seat.  Other localities include: Bear Wall, Brush Grove, Fredericktown, Mackville, Manton, Pleasant Grove, Saint Catharine, Thompsonville and Willisburg.  Washington County covers 301 square miles and was the 10th county created. 

 

Scott County was created from Woodford County and was named in honor of Charles Scott, Revolutionary War General and later Governor of Kentucky.  The County Seat is Georgetown.  Other localities include: Sadieville and Stamping Ground.  Scott County today covers 285 square miles and was the 11th county created. 

 

June 23, 1792, Shelby County was created from Jefferson County.  Shelby was named in honor of Isaac Shelby, first and fifth Governor of Kentucky. Shelbyville is the county seat.  Other localities include: Bagdad, Chestnut Grove, Christianburg, Clark, Clay Village, Cropper, Finchville, Harrisonville, Hemp Ridge, Hooper, Mt. Eden, Mulberry, Olive Branch, Peytona, Pleasureville, Scotts Station, Simpsonville, Southville, Todds Point and Waddy.  Shelby County today covers 386 square miles.  Shelby County was the 12th county created. 

 

June 28, 1792, Logan County is created from Lincoln County by Kentucky Legislators.  Logan was named in honor of Benjamin Logan, Revolutionary War General.  Russellville is the county seat.  Other localities include: Adairville, Auburn, Lewisburg and Olmstead.  Logan County today covers 557 square miles and was the 13th county created

 

August 1, 1792, Scott County, Washington County, Logan County and Shelby County become effective. 

 

December 6, 1792, Clark County is created.  It is the first county formed from two counties.  All previous counties split off from one county.  Clark County received land from Fayette and Bourbon Counties.  Clark was named in honor of George Rogers Clark, Revolutionary War General.  Winchester is the county seat.  Other localities include: Becknerville, Bloomingdale, Colby, Combs Ferry, Ford, Goffs Corner, Lyndale, Pilot View and Trapp.  Clark County was the 15th county created, today it covers 255 square miles.

 

December 12, 1792, Hardin County is created from Nelson County.  It was named in honor of John Hardin, pioneer.  Elizabethtown is the largest city and county seat.  Other localities include: Muldraugh, (partly in Meade County) Radcliff, Sonora, Upton, (partly in LaRue County) Vine Grove, West Point, Cecilia, Fort Knox, Rineyville, Big Spring, Blue Ball, Colesburg, Dever Hollow, Eastview, Glendale, Harcourt, Howell Spring, Hardin Springs, Howe Valley, Kraft, Mill Creek, New Fruit, Nolin, Old Stephensburg, Quaker Valley, Red Mills, St. John, Star Mills, Stephensburg, Summitt, Tip Top, Tunnel Hill, Vertrees, White Mills and Youngers Creek.  Hardin County covers 630 square miles today and was the 16th county created. 

 

December 20, 1792, Green County is created from Lincoln County and Nelson County.  It was the 16th County formed.  Green was named in honor of Nathanael Greene, Revolutionary War General.  Greensburg is the county seat.  Other localities include: Black Gnat, Exie, Pierce and Summersville.  Green County today covers 289 square miles and was the 14th county created. 

Ky1796

December 13, 1796, Bullitt County was created from Jefferson County and Nelson County and was named in honor of Alexander Scott Bullitt, Lieutenant Governor of Kentucky.  The county seat is Shepherdsville.  Other localities include: Fox Chase, Hebron Estates, Hillview, Hunters Hollow, Lebanon Junction, Mount Washington, Pioneer Village, Brooks, Brownington, Clermont and Solitude.  Bullitt County today covers 300 square miles and was the 20th county created. 

 

December 13, 1796, Christian County was created from Logan County.  The county was named in honor of William Christian, Revolutionary War Soldier and founder of Louisville.  The county seat is Hopkinsville.  Other localities include: Crofton, Hopkinsville, LaFayette, Oak Grove, Pembroke, Fairview, Fort Campbell North, Apex, Bainbridge, Bennettstown, Bluff Spring, Casky, Edgoten, Empire, Fearsville, Fruit Hill, Garrettsburg, Gracey, Hensleytown, Herndon, Honey Grove, Howel, Julien, Kelly, Mannington, Newstead, Saint Elmo and Sinking Fork.  Christian County was the 21st county created and covers 722 square miles, the second largest county. 

 

December 14, 1796, Montgomery County was created from Clark County and was named in honor of Richard Mongomery, military general killed at the Battle of Quebec.  Mount Sterling is the county seat.  Other cities and towns include: Camargo, Jeffersonville, Judy and Levee.  Montgomery County was the 22nd county created and covers 199 square miles.

 

December 14, 1796, Bracken County was formed from Campbell County and Mason County and was named in honor of William Bracken, trapper and frontiersman.  Brooksville is the county seat.  Other localities are Augusta,  Foster and Germantown.  Bracken County was the 24th county created and covers 209 square miles.

 

December 19, 1796, Warren County was created from Logan County and was named in honor of Joseph Warren, Revolutionary War General.  Bowling Green is the county seat.  Other localities include: Oakland, Plum Springs, Smiths Grove, Woodburn, Plano, Anna, Bristow, Girkin, Glenmore, Gotts, Hydro, Kepler, Loving, Martinsville, Polkville, Pondsville, Richardsville, Riverside, Sunnyside, Three Forks, and Tuckertown.  In South Warren localities include: Alvatonm Blue Level, Boyce, Browning, Claypool, Drake, Greenhill, Guy, Hadley, Hardcastle, Lost River, Matlock, Memphis Junction, Petros, Rich Pond, Rockfield, Rockland, Shawnee Estates, Springhill and Three Springs.  Warren County was the 23rd county created and covers 546 square miles.

 

December 17, 1796, Garrard County was created from Madison County, Lincoln County and Mercer County.  It was named in honor of James Garrard, second Governor of Kentucky.  Lancaster is the county seat.  Other localities include: Bryantsville, Buckeye, Cartersville, Davis Town, Hyattsville and Paint Lick.  Garrard County was the 25th county created and covers 234 square miles.

KY 1798

February 10, 1798, Fleming County was created from Mason County.  The county was named in honor of John Fleming, frontiersman and one of the county’s original settlers.  The county seat is Flemingsburg.  Other localities include: Ewing, Elizaville, Bald Hill, Beechburg, Blue Bank, Colfax, Concord, Cowan, Craintown, Dalesburg, Fairview, Foxport, Fox Valley, Goddard, Grange City, Hillsboro, Hilltop, Johnson Junction, Mount Carmel, Muses Mills, Nepton, Pleasureville, Plummers Landing, Poplar Grove, Poplar Plains, Ringos Mills, Sherburne, Tilton and Wallingford.  Fleming County was the 26th county created and covers 351 square miles. 

 

March 1, 1798, Fleming County became official. 

 

December 10, 1798, Pulaski County was created from Green County and Lincoln County.  Pulaski was named in honor of Casimir Pulaski, Polish-born Revolutionary War soldier killed at the Battle of Savannah.  Somerset is the county seat.  Other localities include: Burnside, Eubank, Ferguson, Science Hill, Acorn, Alcalde, Antioch, Bandy, Barnesburg, Bee Lick, Blue John, Bronston, Burnetta, Cains Store, Clarence, Coin, Dabney, Delmer, Elihu, Estesburg, Etna, Faubush, Goochtown, Hargis, Haynes Knob, Ingle, Jacksonville, King Bee, Mangum, Meece, Mount Victory, Nancy, Norfleet, Norwood, Oak Hill, Omega, Pointer, Public, Pulaski, Ringgold, Shafter, Shopville, Slate Branch, Sloans Valley, Squib, Stab, Tateville, Valley Oak, Welborn, White Lilly and Woodstock.  Pulaski County was the 34th county created and covers 658 square miles.

 

December 13, 1798, Pendleton County was created from Bracken County and Campbell County.  It was named in honor of Edmund Pendleton, member of the Continental Congress.  Falmouth is the county seat.  Other cities and towns include: Butler, DeMossville, Mt. Auburn, and Morgan, Kentucky.  Pendleton County was the 28th county created and covers 282 square miles.

 

December 13, 1798, Livingston County was created from Christian County.  The county was named in honor of Robert Livingston, one of the Committee of Five that drafted the Declaration of Independence.  Smithland is the county seat.   Other localities include: Carrsville, Grand Rivers, Salem, Burna, Ledbetter, Hampton, Joy, Lola, Iuka and Tiline.  Livingston County was the 33rd county created and covers 342 square miles.

 

December 13, 1798, Boone County was created from Campbell County and was named in honor of Daniel Boone.   Burlington is the county seat.  Other cities and towns located in the county include: Florence, Hebron, Francisville, Petersburg, Union, Walton, Oakbrook, Richwood, Verona, Big Bone, Bullittsville, Hamilton, Richwood, Taylorsport, Constance and Rabbit Hash.  Boone County was the 35th county created and covers 256 square miles.

 

December 13, 1798, Muhlenberg County was created from Christian County and Logan County and was named in honor of Peter Muhlenberg, Revolutionary War General.  Greenville is the county seat.  Other localities include: Bremen, Central City, Drakesboro, Powderly, South Carrollton, Beechmont, Cleaton, Dunmor, Beech Creek, Belton, Bevier, Browder, Depoy, Ennis, Frogtown, Gishton, Graham, Gus, Luzerne, Millport, Moorman, Nelson, Nonell, Penrod, Rosewood and Weir.  Today Muhlenberg County covers 479 square miles and is the 31st county created.

 

December 14, 1798, Henry County was created from Shelby County and was named in honor of Patrick Henry, Revolutionary War-era legislator and U.S. founding father.  New Castle is the county seat.  Other cities and towns include: Bethlehem, Campbellsburg, Defoe, Eminence, Franklinton, Lockport, Pendleton, Pleasureville, Port Royal, Smithfield, Sulphur and Turners Station.  Henry County was the 36st county created and covers 291 square miles.

 

December 14, 1798, Cumberland County was created from Green County and was named for the Cumberland River, which flows through the county. Burksville is the county seat.  Other cities and towns include: Marrowbone, Amandaville, Bakerton, Bow, Dubre, Green Grove, Grider, Judio, Kettle, Modoc, Peytonsburg and Waterview.  Cumberland County was the 37th county created and covers 305 square miles.

 

December 14, 1798, Gallatin County was created from Franklin County and Shelby County and was named in honor of Albert Gallatin, United States Secretary of the Treasury.  Warsaw is the county seat.  Other cities and towns located in the county include: Glencoe and Sparta.  Gallatin County was the 30th county created, the second smallest and covers 105 square miles.

 

December 17, 1798, Ohio County was created from Hardin County and was named for the Ohio River, which formed the county’s northern border.  Hartford is the county seat.  Other cities and towns located in the county include: Beaver Dam, Centertown, Fordsville, McHenry, Rockport, Rosine, Adaburg, Beda, Buford, Haynesville, Heflin, Herbert, Magan, Narrows, Pleasant Ridge, Reynolds Station, Shreve, Silver Beach, Taffy, Baizetown, Ceralvo, Cool Springs, Cromwell, Dundee, Echols, Equality, Horse Branch, Matanzas, Nineteen, Olaton, Prentiss, Select and Shultztown.  Ohio County covers 596 square miles and was the 38th county created. 

 

December 19, 1798, Jessamine County was created from Fayette County and was named for the Jessamine Creek, which contains a set of rapids that are the county’s most well known natural feature.  Nicholasville is the county seat.  Other cities and towns include: Wilmore, High Bridge, Brannon Woods and Keene.  Jessamine County was the 27th county created and covers 175 square miles.

 

December 19, 1798, Barren County was created from Green County and Warren County and was named for the Barrens, a region of grassland in Kentucky. Glasgow is the County Seat.  Other cities and towns located in the county include: Cave City, Park City, Hiseville, Austin, Eighty Eight, Lecta, Rocky Hill, Finney and Temple Hill.  Barren County was the 29th county created and covers 500 square miles.

 

December 21, 1798, Henderson County was created from Christian County and was named in honor of Richard Henderson, founder of the Transylvania Company.  Henderson is the County seat.  Other cities and towns located in the county include: Corydon, Robards, Anthoston, Poole, (partially in Webster County) Spottsville, Alzey, Baskett, Bluff City, Cairo, Dixie, Finley Addition, Geneva, Graham Hill, Hebbardsville, Niagara, Reed, Scuffletown, Smith Mills, Weaverton, Wilson and Zion.  Henderson County was the 32nd county created and covers 466 square miles.

KY 1799

February 1, 1799, Jessamine County becomes effective.

 

May 10, 1799, Pendleton County and Barren County become effective. 

 

May 13, 1799, Gallatin County becomes effective. 

 

May 15, 1799, Muhlenberg County and Henderson County become effective. 

 

May 21, 1799, Livingston County becomes effective. 

 

June 1, 1799, Pulaski County, Boone County and Henry County all become effective.

 

July 1, 1799, Cumberland County and Ohio County become effective.

 

December 9, 1799, Breckinridge County was created from Hardin County and was named in honor of John Breckinridge, Kentucky statesman and U.S. Senator.  Hardinsburg is the county seat.  Other localities include: Cloverport, Irvington, Addison, Axtel, Bewleyville, Big Spring, (partially) Cannons Point, Clifton Mills, Constantine, Custer, Dyer, Fairfield, Falls of Rough, Fisher, Frymire, Garfield, Glen Dean, Harned, Hinton Hills, Hites Run, Holt, Hudson, Kingswood, Kirk, Locust Hill, Lodiburg, Madrid, Mattingly, McCoy, McDaniels, McQuady, Mook, Mooleyville, Mount Merino, Mystic, Raymond, Roff, Sample, Se Ree, Stephensport, Tar Fork, Union Star, Vanzant, Webster and Westview.  Breckinridge County was the 39th county created and covers 586 square miles. 

 

December 13, 1799, Floyd County was created from Fleming County, Mason County and Montgomery County and was named in honor of John Floyd, surveyor and pioneer.  Prestonburg is the county seat.  Other localities include: Allen, Martin, Wayland, Wheelwright, Auxier, Betsy Layne, Dwale, Maytown, McDowell, Alphoretta, Banner, Beaver, Blue Moon, Blue River, Bonanza, Burton, Bypro, Cliff, Dana, David, Dema, Drift, Eastern, Emma, Estill, Garrett, Glo, Grethel, Halo, Harold, Hi Hat, Hippo, Hueysville, Ivel, Jacks Creek, Jump Station, Lackey, Langley, Ligon, Melvin, Minnie, Orkney, Printer, Pyramid, Risner, Stanville, Teaberry, Tram, Warco, Watergap, Weeksbury, Wonder and Woods.  Floyd County was the 40th county created and covers 396 square miles.

 

December 18, 1799, Nicholas County was created from Bourbon County and Mason County and was named in honor of George Nicholas, Revolutionary War Colonel.  Carlisle is the county seat.  Other localities include: East Union, Headquarters, Hooktown, Moorefield and Myers.  Nicholas County was the 41st county created and covers 197 square miles.

 

December 19, 1799, Knox County was created from Lincoln County and was named in honor of Henry Knox, United States Secretary of War.   Barbourville is the county seat.  Other localities include: Corbin, (primarily in Whitley County) Artemus, Flat Lick, North Corbin, (primarily in Laurel County) Gray and Kay Jay.  Knox County was the 42nd county created and covers 388 square miles.

November 14, 1806, Casey County was created from Lincoln County and was named in honor of William Casey, Revolutionary War Colonel.  Liberty is the county seat.  Other cities and towns located in the county include: Bethelridge, Clementsville, Creston, Dunnville, Middleburg, Phil, Jacktown, Teddy, Upper Tygart, Walltown, Windsor and Yosemite.  Casey County was the 49th county created and covers 446 square miles.

 

December 2, 1806, Lewis County was created from Mason County and was named in honor of Meriwether Lewis, explorer.  The county seat is Vanceburg.  Other cities and towns include: Concord, Garrison, Alburn, Awe, Black Oak, Beechy Creek, Buena Vista, Burtonville, Cabin Creek, Camp Dix, Carrs, Charters, Clarksburg, Cottageville, Covedale, Crum, Emerson, Epworth, Esculapia Springs, Fearis, Firebrick, Fruit, Glenn, Glenn Springs, Gun Powder Gap, Harris, Head of Grassy, Heselton, Irwin, Jacktown, Kinniconick, Kirkville, Laurel, Libbie, Martin, McDowell Creek, McKenzie, Montgomery Creek, Nashtown, Noah, Oak Ridge, Pence, Petersville, Poplar Flat, Quicks Run, Randville, Records, Rexton, Ribolt, Rugless, Saint Paul, Salt Lick, Sand Hill, Stricklett, Sullivan, Tannery, Teutonia, Thor, Tollesboro, Trinity (Trinity Station), Upper Bruce, Valley and Wadsworth.  Lewis County was the 47th county created and covers 495 square miles.

 

December 2, 1806, Clay County was created from Madison County, Floyd County and Knox County.  It was named in honor of Green Clay, Revolutionary War General and western surveyor.  The county seat is Manchester.  Other cities and towns include: Oneida, Beech Creek, Benge, Burning Springs, Datha, Fall Rock, Fogertown, Garrad, Goose Rock, Greenbriar, Hector, Larue and Little Goose.  Clay County was the 46th county created in Kentucky and covers 471 square miles.

 

December 9, 1806, Hopkins County was created from Henderson County and was named in honor of Samuel Hopkins, Revolutionary War General.  Madisonville is the county seat.  Other cities and towns include: Dawson Springs, Earlington, Hanson, Mortons Gap, Nebo, Nortonville, St. Charles, White Plains, Manitou,  Anton, Ashbyburg, Barnsley, Charleston, Coiltown, Dalton, Dozier Heights, Ilsley, Richland, and  Wicks Well.  Hopkins County was the 48th county created and covers 554 square miles.

KY 1806

January 27, 1808, Estill County was created from Clark County and Madison County and was named in honor of James Estill, military captain killed at the Battle of Little Mountain.  Irvine is the county seat.  Other localities include: Ravenna, Barnes Mountain, Cobhill, Cressy, Crystal, Drip Rock, Fox, Furnace, Hargett, Leighton, Palmer, Patsey, Pryse, Red Lick, South Irvine, Spout Springs, Tipton Ridge, Wisemantown and Winston.  Estill County was the 50th county created in Kentucky and covers 256 square miles.

 

April 1, 1808, Estill County becomes effective. 

KY 1819

January 28, 1819, Harlan County was created from Knox County.  The county was named in honor of Silas Harlan, Army Major in the Battle of Blue Licks.  The county seat is Harlan.  Other cities and towns include: Benham, Cumberland, Evarts, Loyall, Lynch, Ages, Cawood, Coldiron, Kenvir, Pathfork, South Wallins, Wallins Creek, Baxter, Bledsoe, Brookside, Closplint, Cranks, Dayhoit, Elcomb, Fresh Meadows, Grays Knob, Gulston, Highsplint, Holmes Mill, Putney, Pine Mountain, Rosspoint, Smith, Tacky Town, Teetersville, Totz and Verda.  Harlan County was the 60th county created and covers 468 square miles.

 

January 28, 1819, Hart County was created from Hardin County and Barren County.  Hart was named in honor of Nathaniel G. S. Hart, army major and lawyer captured at the Battle of Frenchtown.  The county seat is Munfordville.  Other cities and towns include: Bonnieville, Horse Cave, HardyvilleCanmer, Cub Run, Hammonville, Legrande, Linwood, Monroe, Priceville, Rowletts and Uno.  Hart County was the 61st county created and covers 418 square miles.

 

January 28, 1819, Simpson County was created from Allen County, Logan County and Warren County.  It was named in honor of John Simpson, military captain killed at the Battle of Frenchtown.  The county seat is Franklin.  Other cities and towns include: Gold City, Middleton, Neosheo, Prices Mill, Providence, Rapids and Salmons.  Simpson County was the 62nd county created and covers 236 square miles.

 

February 6, 1819, Owen County was created from Scott County, Franklin County, Gallatin County and Pendleton County.  It was named in honor of Abraham Owen, killed at the Battle of Tippecanoe.  The county seat is Owenton.  Other cities and towns include: Gratz, Monterey, Hesler, Long Ridge, Lusby's Mill, New Columbus, New Liberty, Perry Park, Pleasant Home, Squiresville and Wheatley.  Owen County was the 63rd county created and covers 354 square miles.

 

December 30, 1819, Todd County was created from Christian County and Logan County and was named in honor of John Todd, military colonel killed at the Battle of Blue Licks.  Elkton is the county seat.  Other cities and towns include: Guthrie, Trenton, Fairview, Allensville, Allegre, Claymour, Daysville, Clifty, Hadensville, Kirkmansville, Pea Ridge, Penicktown, Pinchem, Sharon Grove, Tabernacle, Tiny Town, Tress Shop and Tyewhoppety.  Todd County was the 64th county created and covers 376 square miles.

 

April 1, 1819, Harlan County, Hart County, Simpson County and Owen County all become effective. 

KY 1820

January 19, 1820, Monroe County was created from Barren County and Cumberland County and was named in honor of James Monroe, President of the United States.  The county seat is Tompkinsville.  Other cities and towns include: Fountain Run, Gamaliel, Akersville, Alexander, Bugtussle, Center Point, Emberton, Flippin, Gum Tree, Hestand, Jeffrey, Lamb, Mount Hermon, Mud Lick, Persimmon, Rockbridge, Stringtown, Sulphur Lick and Vernon.  Monroe County was the 65th county created and covers 332 square miles.

 

January 27, 1820, Trigg County was created from Christian County and Caldwell County and was named in honor of Stephen Trigg, military colonel killed at the Battle of Blue Licks.  Cadiz is the county seat.  Other cities and towns include: Cerulean, Caledonia, Canton, Linton, Roaring Spring, Rockcastle and Wallonia.  Trigg County was the 66th county created and covers 481 square miles.

 

February 12, 1820, Grant County was created from Pendleton County and was named in honor of Samuel Grant, John Grant, and Squire Grant, three of the county’s earliest settlers.  Williamstown is the county seat.  Other cities and towns include: Corinth, Crittenden, Dry Ridge and Jonesville.  Grant County was the 67th county created and covers 261 square miles.

 

April 1, 1820, Todd County, Monroe County, Trigg County and Grant County all become effective. 

 

November 2, 1820, Perry County was created from Clay County and Floyd County and was named in honor of Oliver Hazard Perry, Admiral in the War of 1812.  Hazard is the county seat.  Other cities and towns include: Buckhorn, Vicco, Combs, Diablock, Jeff, Allais, Allock, Ary, Avawam, Beehive, Blue Diamond, Boat, Bonnyman, Bulan, Busy, Butterfly, Chavies, Christopher, Clemons, Combs, Cornettsville, Curly Fork, Daisy, Darfork, Defiance, Delphia, Dice, Doorway, Dow, Dunraven, Dwarf, Eversole, Farler, Fourseam, Fusonia, Gays Creek, Glomawr, Grigsby, Happy, Happy Valley, Hardburly, Harveyton, Hilton, Hiner, Hurricane, Johnson, Jones, Kodak, Krypton, Lamont, Leatherwood, Lead Branch, Little Beech, Lothair, Middle Fork, Miller, Mudlick, Napfor, Olivers, Otter Creek, Red Hill, Rock Fork, Saul, Scuddy, Sixteen, Slemp, Stacy, Tenmile, Tilford, Tribbey, Typo, Upper Pidgeonroost, Vicco, Viper, Wentz, Whitaker, Whitsett, Woodland Park and Yerkes.  Perry County  was the 68th county created in Kentucky and covers 343 square miles.

KY 1823

 

January 25, 1823, Calloway County becomes effective. 

 

March 10, 1832, Morgan County becomes effective. 

 

December 15, 1823, Oldham County was created from Henry County, Shelby County and Jefferson County and was named in honor of William Oldham, Revolutionary War Colonel.  La Grange is the county seat.  Other communities include: Crestwood, Goshen, Orchard Grass Hills, Pewee Valley, River Bluff, Buckner, Westport, Ballardsville, Brownsboro, Centerfield, Floydsburg, Park Lake and Prospect.  Oldham County was the 76th county created and covers 196 square miles and is the wealthiest county in Kentucky. 

 

December 17, 1823, Graves County was created from Hickman County and was named in honor of Benjamin F. Graves, army major killed at the Battle of Frenchtown.  Mayfield is the county seat.  Other  communities include: Water Valley, Wingo, Fancy Farm, Farmington, Hickory, Lowes, Pryorsburg, Sedalia, Symsonia, Bell City, Boaz, Clear Springs, Cuba, Dogwood, Dublin, Dukedom (partial), Fairbanks, Feliciana, Folsomdale, Golo, Kaler, Kansas, Lynnville, Melber (partial), Natchez Trace, Pilot Oak, Pottsville, South Highland, Stubblefield, Tri City, Viola, West Viola, Westplains and Wheel.  Graves County was the 74th county created and covers 557 square miles.

 

December 17, 1823, Meade County was created from Hardin County and Breckinridge County and was named in honor of James Meade, military captain killed at the Battle of Frenchtown.  Brandenburg is the county seat.  Other localities include: Ekron, Muldraugh, Guston, Flaherty, Doe Valley, Fort Knox, a military base (partly in Hardin County) Battletown, Big Spring, (partly in Breckinridge County and Hardin County) Concordia, Flaherty, Garrett, Guston, Lickskillet, Meade, Payneville, Rhodelia, Rock Haven, Wolf Creek, Garnettsville and Buck Grove.  Meade County was the 77th county created and covers 305 square miles.

February 8, 1839, Breathitt County was created from Clay County, Estill County and Perry County and was named in honor of John Breathitt, 11th Governor of Kentucky.  Jackson is the county seat.  Other localities include: Altro, Bays, Caney, Canoe, Chenowee, Clayhole, Cockrell Fork, (on line between Breathitt and Perry Counties) Crockettsville, Elkatawa, Evanston, Fishtrap, Flintville, Frozen/Frozen Creek, Fugates Fork, Gauge, Haddix, Hardshell Caney, Hayes Branch, Leatherwood, Lost Creek, Morris Fork, Ned, Nix Branch, Noble, Noctor, Oakdale, Portsmouth, Quicksand, River Caney, Riverside, Rose Branch, Rousseau, Rowdy, Saldee, Sebastians Branch, Shoulder Blade/Shoulderblade, Smith Branch, South Fork, Stevenson, Troublesome Creek, Turners Creek, Vancleve, War Creek, Watts, Whick, Wilstacy and Wolf Coal.  Breathitt County was the 89th county created in Kentucky and covers 495 square miles.

 

April 1, 1839, Breathitt County is effective. 

KY 1842

January 26, 1842, Crittenden County was created from Livingston County and was named in honor of John Jordan Crittenden, 17th Governor of Kentucky.  The county seat is Marion.  Other localities include: Dycusburg, Crayne, Tolu, Frances, Mattoon, Mexico, Midway, Shady Grove, and Sheridan.  Crittenden County was the 92nd county created and covers 361 square miles.

 

February 12, 1842, Marshall County was created from Calloway County and was named in honor of John Marshall, Chief Justice of the United States Supreme Court.  Benton is the county seat.  Other localities include: Calvert City, Hardin, Gilbertsville, Aurora, Big Bear Area, Brewers, Briensburg, Draffenville, Fairdealing, Harvey, Moors Camp Area, Oak Level, Olive, Palma, Possum Trot, Sharpe and Tatumsville.  Marshall County was the 95th county created and covers 304 square miles.

 

February 15, 1842, Ballard County was created from Hickman County and McCracken County and was named in honor of Bland Ballard, hero of the Battle of Fallen Timbers and Battle of River Raisin.  Wickliffe is the county seat.  Other localities include: Barlow, Blandville, Kevil, LaCenter, Bandana, Lovelaceville, Monkey's Eyebrow and New York.  Ballard County was the 94th county created and covers 274 square miles.

 

February 15, 1842, Boyle County was created from Lincoln County and Mercer County and was named in honor of John Boyle, Chief Justice of the Kentucky Court of Appeals.  Danville is the county seat.  Other localities include: Aliceton, Alum Springs, (area between Parksville and Junction City) Atoka, Brumfield, Forkland, Junction City, Little Needmore, Mitchellsburg, Needmore, Parksville, Perryville and Shelby City. (annexed by Junction City) Boyle County was the 91st county created in Kentucky and covers 183 square miles.

 

March 1, 1842, Boyle County is effective. 

 

March 3, 1842, Letcher County was created from Perry County and Harlan County and was named in honor of Robert P. Letcher, 15th Governor of Kentucky.  The county seat is Whitesburg.  Other localities include: Blackey, Fleming-Neon, Jenkins, Mayking, McRoberts, Millstone, Payne Gap, Beefhide, (partial) Burdine, Deane, Dunham, Eolia, Ermine, Gaskill, Gilley, Hemphill, Isom, Jeremiah, Letcher and Seco.  Letcher County was the 93rd county created and covers 339 square miles.

 

April 1, 1842, Letcher County and Crittenden County become effective.

 

May 23, 1842, Ballard County becomes effective. 

KY 1843

January 23, 1843, Owsley County was created from Clay County, Estill County and Breathitt County.  The county was named in honor of William Owsley, Kentucky Secretary of State and later Governor of Kentucky.  The county seat is Booneville.  Other localities include: Arnett, Big Springs, Blake,  Brewer Neighborhood, Chestnut Gap, Conkling, Couch Fork, Couch Town, Cowcreek, Elk Lick, Endee, Eversole, Fish Creek, Hall, Hogg, Indian Creek, Island City, Lerose, Levi, Lucky Fork, Major, Mistletoe, Moors, Needmore, Pebworth, Pleasant, Ricetown, Rock Spring, Rockhouse, Scoville, Sebastian, Shephard, Southfork, Stacey, Stay, Sturgeon, Sugar Camp, Taft, Travellers Rest, Vincent and Whoopflarea.  Owsley County was the 98th county created in Kentucky and covers 198 square miles.

 

February 24, 1843, Johnson County was created from Floyd County, Morgan County and Lawrence County and was named in honor of Richard Mentor Johnson, Vice President of the United States.  Paintsville is the county seat.  Other localities include: Asa, Boonscamp, Chandlerville, Collista, Denver, Dobson, East Point, Elna, Flat Gap, Fuget, Hager Hill, Hargis, Keaton, Kerz, Leander, Low Gap, Manila, Meally, Nero, Nippa, Odds, Offutt, Oil Springs, Redbush, River, Riceville, Sip, Sitka, Staffordsville, Stambaugh, Swamp Branch, Thealka, Thelma, Tutor Key, Van Lear, Volga, West Van Lear, Whitehouse, Williamsport, Winifred and Wittensville.  Johnson County was the 97th county created and covers 264 square miles.

 

March 4, 1843, LaRue County was created from Hardin County and was named in honor of John Larue, one of the county’s original settlers and the grandfather of Governor John L. Helm.  The county seat is Hodgenville.  Other localities include: Upton, (partly in Hardin County) Buffalo, Magnolia, Athertonville, Lyons, Mount Sherman and Tonieville.  LaRue County was the 96th county created and covers 263 square miles. 

 

March 4,  1843, LaRue County is effective. 

 

April 1, 1843, Johnson County is effective. 

 

June 1, 1843, Owsley County is effective. 

KY 1860

February 1, 1860, Metcalfe County was created from Barren County, Monroe County, Adair County, Cumberland County and Green County and was named in honor of Thomas Metcalfe, 10th Governor of Kentucky.  Edmonton is the county seat.  Other localities include: Summer Shade, Beaumont, Center, Knob Lick, Randolph, Savoyard, Sulphur Well and Wisdom.  Metcalfe County was the 108th county created and covers 291 square miles.

 

February 16, 1860, Boyd County was created from Carter County, Lawrence County and Greenup County and was named in honor of Linn Boyd, United States Congressman and Lieutenant Governor of Kentucky.  Catlettsburg is the county seat.  Other localities include: Ashland, Cannonsburg, Ironville, Westwood, Burnaugh, Coalton, Durbin, Kavanaugh, Kilgore, Lockwood, Meads, Normal, Princess, Rockdale, Rush, Summit, Unity and Westwood.  Boyd County was the 107th county created in Kentucky and covers 160 square miles.

 

February 22, 1860, Magoffin County was created from Floyd County, Johnson County and Morgan County and was named in honor of Beriah Magoffin, 21st Governor of Kentucky.  Salyersville is the county seat.  Other localities include: Elsie, Falcon, Foraker, Fredville, Gunlock, Hendricks, Ivyton, Logville, Royalton, Sublett, Swampton, Wheelersburg and Wonnie.  Magoffin County was the 106th county created and covers 309 square miles.

 

February 29, 1860, Webster County was created from Hopkins County, Union County and Henderson County and was named in honor of Daniel Webster, U.S. Senator from Massachusetts and United States Secretary of State.  Dixon is the county seat.  Other localities include: Clay, Providence, Sebree, Slaughters, Wheatcroft, Onton, Poole, Blackford, Diamond, Jolly, Lisman, Little Zion, Ortiz, Pratt, Stanhope, Vanderburg and Wanamaker.  Webster County was the 109th county created and covers 336 square miles.

 

March 5, 1860, Wolfe County was created from Owsley County, Breathitt County, Powell County and Morgan County and was named in honor of Nathaniel Wolfe, member of the Kentucky General Assembly.  Campton is the county seat.  Other localities include: Hazel Green, Baptist, Bear Pen, Bethany, FlatLee City, Olivia, Pence, , Pine Ridge and Trent.  Wolfe County was the 110th county created in Kentucky and covers 223 square miles.

 

April 25, 1860, Magoffin County becomes effective. 

 

May 1, 1860, Boyd County becomes effective. 

 

May 7, 1860, Metcalfe becomes effective. 

 

July 1, 1860, Wolfe County becomes effective.

 

July 1, 1860, Webster becomes effective.