TODAY IN KENTUCKY HISTORY

Thank You For Visiting

September 6, 1845, Dr. J. D. Taylor of Harrodsburg dueled John M. Harrison of Danville in Garrard County with pistols at 30 feet.  A ball went through Harrison at first fire and he died several days later.  The duelist were bothers-in-law and the cause of the affair was a separation between Taylor and his wife, attributed to Harrison.
Famous Kentucky Duels by J. Winston Coleman, Jr.; pg: 143

September 6, 1807, William Clark arrived in Boone County with his famous older brother, General George Rogers Clark.  The two arrived together, not so much for his assistance in a project, but so William could keep an eye on George.  George was an alcoholic and William was so devoted to him that he wanted to ensure George’s health and safety.

September 6, 1814, Kentuckians honored George Madison with a public dinner when he returned from being a POW after the War of 1812.  He became governor less than two years later.

September 6, 1848, John J. Crittenden became the 17th governor of Kentucky.  One of Crittenden’s sons, George B. Crittenden, became a general in the Confederate Army.  Another son, Thomas Leonidas Crittenden, became a general in the Union Army.

September 6, 1861, the General Assembly passed a resolution calling for Confederate troops to leave Kentucky; soon after, Kentucky declared their allegiance to the Union ending their status of neutrality.

September 6, 1893, Officer R. H. West of the Hopkinsville Police Department, was shot and killed by a fellow officer whom he had reported for drinking on duty.

September 6, 1912, St. Charles native Bobby Veach made his MLB debut for the Detroit Tigers.

September 6, 1912, Patrolman Edward J. Stephens, Louisville Police Department, died after suffering heatstroke while walking his beat in excessive temperatures.

Saturday, September 6, 1947, state fair officials clamped down on gambling on the midway.  The fair held a preview for the press and state officials the night before the grand opening for the general public and sanctioned many workers on the midway for gambling.

September 6, 1950, Army PFC James M. Harrison from Floyd County, Army CPL David L. Rankin from Casey County, Army PFC Billy J. Roper from McCracken County, Army PFC Raymond T. Ross from Estill County, and Army PVT Kenneth R. Shaw from Jefferson County, all died in the Korean War.

September 6, 1951, Army PVT Carl D. Logan from Perry County died in the Korean War.

September 6, 1952, Army MSG James V. Boggs from Lawrence County died in the Korean War.

September 6, 1958, the Blues roll over the Whites 28-8 when UK played their annual Blue White game in Lexington for Coach Blanton Collier.

Localtonians wishes a Happy Birthday to Owensboro native Jeff Green, born in 1962.

September 6, 1963, Miss Peggy Sullivan, a 17-year-old Horse Cave beauty, was crowned Kentucky Tobacco Princess at the State Fairgrounds.  As a result, the Caverna High School senior represented Kentucky in the Queen of Tobacco Land Pageant in Richmond, VA.

September 6, 1969, Air Force SGT Arnold N. Jaco from Benton in Marshall County died in the Vietnam War.

September 6, 1974, Governor W. Ford said that he hopes the state’s $120,500 purchase of Six Mile Island will block the development of an Indiana Riverport.

Localtonians wishes a Happy Birthday to Ashland native Jillian Hall, born in 1980.

September 6, 1988, President Reagan gave his remarks at the American Legion Convention in Louisville.

September 6, 1990, Senator Mitch McConnell beat Harvey Sloane in their first televised debate.

Kentucky Trivia:  The Blackstone Group has been Mitch’s number one campaign contributor throughout his long career.  Second is Kindred Healthcare.  Third is NorPAc and fourth is Humana, Inc.

On September 6, 1992, President George Bush arrived at the Redbirds game with Stan Curtis.  The President came to celebrate the fifth anniversary of Kentucky Harvest, a charity that provides food to the poor.  Stan Curtis, the founder of Kentucky Harvest, went to prison for stealing from the charity years later.  

September 6, 1995, Cal Ripkin broke Lou Gehrig’s unbreakable record when he played in his 2,131st consecutive major league baseball game.

September 6, 2008, the GIII $100,000 Turfway Park Fall Championship Stakes is contested at 1 1/2 miles on the all surface track for three-year-olds and upward.

September 6, 2014, a Kentucky bred and Keeneland graduate takes the $200,000 GII Pocahontas Stakes going 1 1/16 miles at Churchill Downs.

September 6, 2020, Kentucky reported 313 new cases of coronavirus and three new deaths.  It was the second consecutive week a new weekly record was set for new positive cases.  The totals now stood at 52,744 positive cases and 996 deaths.