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Timeline

Localtonians Kentucky Counties Timeline is listed by the dates when each of the 120 counties was officially created. Each entry (county) denotes who or what the county was named for, cities within the county, the size in square miles and the sequence number for the county’s creation. There are a few instances when a county was formed but not recognized by the state legislature until a later date, therefore the date created and sequence number may not match up. Please find the major references: Ancestry.com,  mapsofus.org and KY. Gov.

1776
December 31, 1776, two years after the first settlement at Harrodsburg, the Virginia Legislature divided all the territory west of the mountains, known as Fincastle County into: Washington, Montgomery, and Kentucky Counties. Harrodsburg was the first county seat of Kentucky County and the territory was essentially the same boundary as the state is today. Ref: 1

1780
June 30, 1780, the Virginia Assembly divided Kentucky County into Fayette, Lincoln and Jefferson Counties.  At the time, the new counties were home to five established communities: Boonesborough, Fort Harrod/Boiling Springs, St. Asaph, later called Logan’s Station, McClelland’s Station and Leestown.  

LINCOLN County was one of the first three counties originally created by Virginia. The county was named in honor of Benjamin Lincoln (1733–1810), Revolutionary War General. Cities and towns located in the county today include Crab Orchard, Eubank, Hustonville, Stanford. Lincoln County assumed its present boundary in February 1843 and covers 337 square miles.

JEFFERSON County was one of the first three counties originally created by Virginia. The county was named in honor of Thomas Jefferson, then Governor of Virginia and later President of the United States (1801–1809). Cities and towns located in the county  today include Anchorage, Audubon Park, Bancroft, Barbourmeade, Beechwood Village, Bellemeade, Bellewood, Blue Ridge Manor, Briarwood, Broad Fields, Broeck Pointe, Brownsboro Farm, Brownsboro Village, Cambridge, Cherrywood Village, Coldstream, Creekside, Crossgate, Douglass Hills, Druid Hills, Fairmeade, Fincastle, Fisherville, Forest Hills, Glenview Hills, Glenview Manor, Glenview, Goose Creek, Graymoor-Devondale, Green Spring, Hickory Hill, Hills and Dales, Hollow Creek, Hollyvilla, Houston Acres, Hurstbourne Acres, Hurstbourne, Indian Hills, Jeffersontown, Keeneland, Kingsley, Langdon Place, Lincolnshire, Louisville, Lyndon, Lynnview, Manor Creek, Maryhill Estates, Meadow Vale, Meadowbrook Farm, Meadowview Estates, Middletown, Minor Lane Heights, Mockingbird Valley, Moorland, Murray Hill, Norbourne Estates, Northfield, Norwood, Old Brownsboro Place, Parkway Village, Plantation, Plymouth Village, Poplar Hills, Prospect, Richlawn, Riverwood, Rolling Fields, Rolling Hills, Seneca Gardens, Shively, South Park View, Spring Mill, Spring Valley, Springlee, St. Matthews, St. Regis Park, Strathmoor Manor, Strathmoor Village, Sycamore, Ten Broeck, Thornhill, Watterson Park, Wellington, West Buechel, Wildwood, Windy Hills, Woodland Hills, Woodlawn Park, Worthington Hills and Whipps Millgate. Jefferson County covers 386 square miles.

FAYETTE County was one of the three counties originally created by Virginia and named in honor of Gilbert du Motier, marquis de Lafayette (1757–1834), French-born Revolutionary War General. Cities and towns located in the county today include Lexington, Athens, Clays Ferry, Little Texas, South Elkhorn and Spears. Fayette County covers 280 square miles.

Fayette, Jefferson, Lincoln Counties1784
November 29, 1784, NELSON County was created from Jefferson County and was named in honor of Thomas Nelson, Jr. (1738–1789), signer of the Declaration of Independence. Cities and towns located in the county include Bardstown, Bloomfield, Fairfield, New Haven, and New Hope. This was the 4th county created, the first after the original three. Nelson County was created by the Virginia legislature and covers 437 square miles.1785
October 17, 1785, BOURBON County was created from Fayette County and was named for the House of Bourbon, European royal house. Cities and towns located in the county include Millersburg, North Middletown and Paris. Bourbon County was the 5th county created by the Virginia legislature and covers 292 square miles.

December 15, 1785, MERCER County was created from Lincoln County and was named in honor of Gen. Hugh Mercer (1726–1777), Revolutionary War hero who was killed at the Battle of Princeton. Cities and towns located in the county include Burgin, Harrodsburg, Salvisa and Talmage-Mayo. Mercer County was the 6th county created by the Virginia legislature and covers 250 square miles.

December 15, 1785, MADISON County was created from Lincoln County and was named in honor of James Madison, President of the United States (1809–1817). Cities and towns located in the county include Berea, Richmond and Waco. Madison County was the 7th county created by the Virginia legislature and covers 443 square miles.1788
November 5, 1788, MASON County was created from Bourbon County and was named in honor of George Mason (1725–1792), statesman known as the “Father of the Bill of Rights”. Cities and towns located in the county include Dover, Germantown, Maysville and Sardis. Mason County was the 8th county created by the Virginia legislature and covers 241 square miles.

November 12, 1788, WOODFORD County was created from Fayette County and was named in honor of William Woodford (1734–1780), Revolutionary War General. Cities and towns located in the county include Midway, Versailles, Millville, Nonesuch, Mortonsville and Troy. Woodford County was the 9th and last county created by the Virginia legislature and covers 192 square miles.1792
June 1, 1792, SCOTT County was created from Woodford County and was named in honor of Charles Scott, Revolutionary War General and later Governor of Kentucky (1808–1812). Cities and towns located in the county include Georgetown, Sadieville and Stamping Ground. Scott County was the 11th county created and covers 286 square miles.

June 2, 1792, WASHINGTON County was created from Nelson County and was named in honor of George Washington, President of the United States (1789–1797). Cities and towns located in the county include Mackville, Springfield, Willisburg and Manton. Washington County was the 10th county created and the first county created by the new state of Kentucky, covers 301 square miles.

June 23, 1792, SHELBY County was created from Jefferson County and was named in honor of Isaac Shelby, first and fifth Governor of Kentucky (1792–1796; 1812–1816). Cities and towns located in the county include Bagdad, Chestnut Grove, Christianburg, Clark, Clay Village, Cropper, Finchville, Harrisonville, Hemp Ridge, Hooper, Mt. Eden, Mulberry, Olive Branch, Peytona, Pleasureville, Scotts Station, Shelbyville, Simpsonville, Southville, Todds Point and Waddy. Shelby County was the 12th county created in Kentucky and covers 385 square miles.

September 1, 1792, LOGAN County was created from Lincoln County and was named in honor of Benjamin Logan (1742–1802), Revolutionary War General. Cities and towns located in the county include Adairville, Auburn, Lewisburg and Russellville. Logan County was the 13th county created and covers 556 square miles.

December 6, 1792, CLARK County was created from Bourbon County and Fayette County and was named in honor of George Rogers Clark (1752–1818), Revolutionary War General. Winchester is the lone city in Clark County, was the 14th county created and covers 255 square miles.

December 15, 1792, HARDIN County was created from Nelson County and was named in honor of John Hardin (1753–1792), pioneer. Cities and towns located in the county include Elizabethtown, Glendale, Fort Knox, Radcliff, Sonora, Upton – Partly in LaRue County), Vine Grove, West Point, Cecilia, Rineyville, Eastview and Stephensburg. Hardin County was the 15th county created and covers 616 square miles.

December 20, 1792, GREEN County was created from Lincoln County and Nelson County and was named in honor of Nathanael Greene (1742–1786), Revolutionary War General. Cities and towns located in the county include Black Gnat, Exie, Greensburg, Pierce and Summersville. Green County was the 16th county created and covers 289 square miles. 1793
December 21, 1793, HARRISON County was created from Bourbon County and Scott County and was named in honor of Benjamin Harrison (1726–1791), co-author of the Kentucky Constitution. Cities and towns located in the county include Berry, Cynthiana and Leesburg. Harrison County was the 17th county created in Kentucky and covers 310 square miles.1794
December 7, 1794, FRANKLIN County was created from portions of Woodford County, Mercer County and Shelby County and was named in honor of Benjamin Franklin (1706–1790), signer of the Declaration of Independence and U.S. Founding Father. Cities and towns located in the county include Bridgeport, Forks of Elkhorn, Frankfort, Jett and Switzer. Franklin County was the 18th county created and covers 212 square miles.

December 17, 1794, CAMPBELL County was created from Harrison County, Mason County and Scott County and was named in honor of John Campbell (1735–1799), Revolutionary War Colonel. Cities and towns located in the county include Alexandria, Bellevue, California, Claryville, Cold Spring, Crestview, Dayton, Fort Thomas, Highland Heights, Melbourne, Mentor, Newport, Silver Grove, Southgate, Wilder and Woodlawn. Campbell County was the 19th county created and covers 152 square mile

1796
December 13, 1796, BULLITT County was created from Jefferson County and Nelson County and was named in honor of Alexander Scott Bullitt, Lieutenant Governor of Kentucky (1800–1804). Cities and towns located in the county include Brooks, Fox Chase, Hebron Estates, Hillview, Hunters Hollow, Lebanon Junction, Mount Washington, Pioneer Village and Shepherdsville. Bullitt County was the 20th county created and covers 300 square miles.

December 13, 1796, CHRISTIAN County was created from Logan County (organized on March l, 1797). Currently the county was named in honor of William Christian (1743–1786), Revolutionary War Soldier and founder of Louisville, Kentucky. Cities and towns located in the county include Crofton, Fort Campbell North, Hopkinsville, LaFayette, Oak Grove and Pembroke. Christian County was the 21st county created and covers 722 square miles, the second largest.

December 14, 1796, MONTGOMERY County was created from Clark County and was named in honor of Richard Mongomery (1736–1775), military general killed at the Battle of Quebec. Cities and towns located in the county include Camargo, Jeffersonville and Mount Sterling. Montgomery County was the 22nd county created and covers 199 square miles.

December 14, 1796, BRACKEN County was formed from Campbell County and Mason County and was named in honor of William Bracken, trapper and frontiersman. Cities and towns located in the county include Augusta, Brooksville and Germantown. Bracken County was the 23rd county created and covers 206 square miles.

December 19, 1796, WARREN County was created from Logan County and was named in honor of Joseph Warren (1741–1775), Revolutionary War General. Cities and towns located in the county include Bowling Green, Oakland, Plum Springs, Smiths Grove, Woodburn, Rockfield, Richpond and Plano. Warren County was the 24th county created and covers 546 sqaure miles.

December 17, 1796, GARRARD County was created from Madison County, Lincoln County and Mercer County and was named in honor of James Garrard, second Governor of Kentucky (1796–1804). Cities and towns located in the county include Lancaster, Bryantsville, Paint Lick and Cartersvile. Garrard County was the 25th county created and covers 232 square miles.1798
February 10, 1798, FLEMING County was created from Mason County (Fleming County was taken to form Floyd County in 1800 and Rowan County in 1856.). Currently the county was named in honor of John Fleming (1735–1791), frontiersman and one of the county’s original settlers. Cities and towns located in the county include Ewing, Flemingsburg and Nepton. Fleming County was the 26th county created and covers 351 square miles.

December 10, 1798, PULASKI County was created from Green County and Lincoln County and was named in honor of Casimir Pulaski (1746–1779), Polish-born Revolutionary War soldier killed at the Battle of Savannah. Cities and towns located in the county include Burnside, Eubank, Ferguson, Nancy, Science Hill, Shopville and Somerset. Pulaski County was the 27th county created and covers 660 square miles.

December 13, 1798, PENDLETON County was created from Bracken County and Campbell County and was named in honor of Edmund Pendleton (1721–1803), member of the Continental Congress. Cities and towns located in the county include Butler, De Mossville and Falmouth. Pendleton County was the 28th county created and covers 281 square miles.

December 13, 1798, LIVINGSTON County was created from Christian County (Although Livingston was created 13 Dec 1798, county administration didn’t become effective until 21 May 1799). Currently the county was named in honor of Robert Livingston (1746–1813), one of the Committee of Five that drafted the Declaration of Independence. Cities and towns located in the county include Carrsville, Grand Rivers, Ledbetter, Salem and Smithland. Livingston County was the 29th county created and covers 312 square miles.

December 13, 1798, BOONE County was created from Campbell County and was named in honor of Daniel Boone (1734–1820). Cities and towns located in the county include Burlington, Florence, Hebron, Petersburg, Union, Walton, Richwood, Verona, Big Bone, and Rabbit Hash. Boone County was the 30th county created and covers 252 square miles.

December 14, 1798, HENRY County was created from Shelby County and was named in honor of Patrick Henry (1736–1799), Revolutionary War-era legislator and U.S. founding father. Cities and towns located in the county include Campbellsburg, Eminence, New Castle, Pleasureville and Smithfield. Henry County was the 31st county created and covers 289 square miles.

December 14, 1798, CUMBERLAND County was created from Green County and was named for the Cumberland River, which flows through the county. Cities and towns located in the county include Burkesville. Cumberland County was the 32nd county created and covers 307 square miles.

December 14, 1798, GALLATIN County was created from Franklin County and Shelby County and was named in honor of Albert Gallatin, United States Secretary of the Treasury (1801–1814). Cities and towns located in the county include Glencoe, Sparta and Warsaw. Gallatin County was the 33rd county created and covers 99 square miles.

December 14, 1798, MUHLENBERG County was created from Christian County and Logan County and was named in honor of Peter Muhlenberg (1746–1807), Revolutionary War General. Cities and towns located in the county include Bremen, Central City, Drakesboro, Greenville, Powderly and South Carrollton. Muhlenberg County was the 34th county created and covers 478 square miles.

December 17, 1798, OHIO County was created from Hardin County and was named for the Ohio River, which formed the county’s northern border. Cities and towns located in the county include Baizetown, Beaver Dam, Centertown, Cool Springs, Cromwell, Dundee, Echols, Fordsville, Hartford, Magan, McHenry, Pleasant Ridge, Prentiss, Rockport and Rosine. Ohio County was the 35th county created and covers 596 square miles.

December 19, 1798, JESSAMINE County was created from Fayette County and was named for the Jessamine Creek, which contains a set of rapids that are the county’s most well known natural feature. Cities and towns located in the county include Nicholasville and Wilmore. Jessamine County was the 36th county created and covers 174 square miles.

December 20, 1798, BARREN County was created from Green County and Warren County and was named for the Barrens, a region of grassland in Kentucky. Cities and towns located in the county include Cave City, Eighty Eight, Glasgow, Hiseville and Park City. Barren County was the 37th county created and covers 482 square miles.

December 21, 1798, HENDERSON County was created from Christian County and was named in honor of Richard Henderson (1734–1785), founder of the Transylvania Company. Cities and towns located in the county include Corydon, Henderson and Robards. Henderson County was the 38th county created and covers 438 square miles.1799
December 7, 1799, BRECKINRIDGE County was created from Hardin County and was named in honor of John Breckinridge (1760–1806), Kentucky statesman and U.S. Senator. Cities and towns located in the county include Cloverport, Hardinsburg, Irvington, McDaniels, McQuady, Webster, Harned, Custer, Hites Run, Constantine and Garfield. Breckinridge County was the 39th county created and covers 565 square miles. 

December 13, 1799, (effective June 1, 1800) FLOYD County was created from Fleming County, Mason County and Montgomery County and was named in honor of John Floyd (1750–1783), surveyor and pioneer. Cities and towns located in the county include Allen, Martin, Prestonsburg, Wayland, Wheelwright and David. Floyd County was the 40th county created and covers 393 square miles.

December 18, 1799, NICHOLAS County was created from Bourbon County and Mason County and was named in honor of George Nicholas (1743–1799), Revolutionary War Colonel. Cities and towns located in the county include Carlisle, East Union, Headquarters, Hooktown, Moorefield and Myers. Nicholas County was the 42nd county created and covers 197 square miles.

December 19, 1799, KNOX County was created from Lincoln County and was named in honor of Henry Knox, United States Secretary of War (1785–1794). Cities and towns located in the county include Barbourville, Corbin and North Corbin. Knox County was the 41st county created and covers 388 square miles.

1800
December 18, 1800, WAYNE County was created from parts of Pulaski County and Cumberland County and was named in honor of Anthony Wayne (1745–1796), Revolutionary War General. Cities and towns located in the county include Monticello, Parmleysville, Powersburg, Sunnybrook, Windy, Barrier, Rocky Branch, Big Sinkin, Frazier, Alpha, Cooper, Roger’s Grove, Duncan Valley. Wayne County was the 43rd county created and covers 446 square miles.

1801
December 11, 1801, ADAIR County was created from Green County and was named in honor of John Adair, eighth Governor of Kentucky (1820–1824). Cities and towns located in the county include Columbia. Adair County was the 44th county created and covers 407 square miles.1803
December 12, 1803, GREENUP County was created from Mason County and was named in honor of Christopher Greenup, third Governor of Kentucky (1804–1808). Cities and towns located in the county include Bellefonte, Flatwoods, Greenup, Raceland, Russell, South Shore, Worthington and Wurtland. Greenup County was the 45th county created and covers 350 square miles.1806
November 14, 1806, CASEY County was created from Lincoln County and was named in honor of William Casey (1754–1816), Revolutionary War Colonel. Cities and towns located in the county include Liberty, Clementsville, Yosemite, Middleburg, Walltown and Dunnville. Casey County was the 46th county created and covers 435 square miles.

December 2, 1806, LEWIS County was created from Mason County and was named in honor of Meriwether Lewis (1774–1809), explorer. Cities and towns located in the county include Concord, Vanceburg, Tollesboro, Cabin Creek, Garrison and Ribolt. Lewis County was the 48th county created and covers 484 square miles.

December 9, 1806, HOPKINS County was created from Henderson County and was named in honor of Samuel Hopkins (1753–1819), Revolutionary War General. Cities and towns located in the county include Charleston, Dawson Springs, Earlington, Hanson, Madisonville, Mortons Gap, Nebo, Nortonville, St. Charles, White Plains and Manitou. Hopkins County was the 49th county created and covers 552 square miles.1807
April 1, 1807, CLAY County was created (formed in December 1806) from Madison County, Floyd County and Knox County and was named in honor of Green Clay (1757–1828), Revolutionary War General and western surveyor. Cities and towns located in the county include Manchester, Oneida, Burning Springs and Goose Rock. Clay County was the 47th county created in Kentucky and covers 471 square miles.

1808
February 19, 1808, ESTILL County was created from Clark County and Madison County and was named in honor of James Estill (1750–1782), military captain killed at the Battle of Little Mountain. Cities and towns located in the county include Irvine and Ravenna. Estill County was the 50th county created in Kentucky and covers 256 square miles.

1809
January 31, 1809, CALDWELL County was created from Livingston County and was named in honor of John Caldwell, Lieutenant Governor of Kentucky (1804). Cities and towns located in the county include Fredonia and Princeton. Caldwell County was the 51st county created and covers 357 square miles.1810
January 8, 1810, ROCKCASTLE County was created from Pulaski County, Lincoln County, Knox County and Madison County and was named for the Rockcastle River, the boundary between Rockcastle and Laurel County. Cities and towns located in the county include Brodhead, Livingston and Mount Vernon. Rockcastle County was the 52nd county created and covers 318 square miles.

January 18, 1810, BUTLER County was created from Logan County and Ohio County and was named in honor of Richard Butler (1743–1791), Revolutionary War General. Cities and towns located in the county include Morgantown, Rochester and Woodbury. Butler County was the 53rd county created and covers 431 square miles.

January 25, 1810, GRAYSON County was created from the western part of Hardin County and the eastern part of Ohio County. Currently the county was named in honor of William Grayson (1740–1790), aide to George Washington in the Revolutionary War and U.S. Senator from Virginia. Cities and towns located in the county include Big Clifty, Caneyville, Clarkson and Leitchfield. Grayson County was the 54th county created and covers 493 square miles.1811
January 15, 1811, UNION County was created from Henderson County and was named for the unanimous decision of the residents to united together and create a new county. Cities and towns located in the county include Breckinridge Center, Morganfield, Sturgis, Uniontown, Waverly and Sullivan. Union County was the 55th county created and covers 343 square miles.

January 15, 1811, BATH County was created from Montgomery County and was named for the Medicinal Springs located within the county.  Cities and towns located in the county include Owingsville, Salt Lick and Sharpsburg. Bath County was the 56th county created in Kentucky and covers 277 square miles.1815
January 11, 1815, ALLEN County was created from Barren County and Warren County and was named in honor of John Allen (1771–1813), hero of the Battle of Frenchtown in the War of 1812. Cities and towns located in the County include Adolphus, Halfway, Holland, New Roe and Scottsville. Allen County was the 57th county created in Kentucky and covers 338 square miles.

January 14, 1815, DAVIESS County was created from Ohio County (the county’s borders were altered in 1829 to form Hancock County, in 1830 to absorb a small area surrounding Whitesville, in 1854 to cede land to McLean County, and in 1860 to annex forty-four square miles from Henderson County). Currently the county was named in honor of Joseph Hamilton Daviess (1774–1811), lawyer killed at the Battle of Tippecanoe. Cities and towns located in the county include Masonville, Owensboro and Whitesville. Daviess County was the 58th county created and covers 463 square miles.  1818
January 17, 1818, WHITLEY County was created from Knox County and was named in honor of William Whitley (1749–1813), Kentucky pioneer. Cities and towns located in the county include Corbin – (Partly in Knox County), Williamsburg, Gatliff, Goldbug, Julip, Pleasant View, Rockholds, Saxton, Siler, Wofford and Woodbine. Whitley County was the 59th county created in Kentucky and covers 443 square miles.

1819
January 28, 1819, HARLAN County was created from Knox County (portions of its territory went to form Letcher, Bell, and Leslie counties). Currently the county was named in honor of Silas Harlan (1753–1782), Army Major in the Battle of Blue Licks. Cities and towns located in the county include Benham, Cumberland, Dayhoit, Evarts, Harlan, Loyall, Lynch, South Wallins and Wallins Creek. Harlan County was the 60th county created and covers 468 square miles.

January 28, 1819, HART County was created from Hardin County and Barren County. Currently the county was named in honor of Nathaniel G. S. Hart (1784–1813), army major and lawyer captured at the Battle of Frenchtown. Cities and towns located in the county include Bonnieville, Hardyville, Horse Cave, Munfordville, Rowletts and Uno. Hart County was the 61st county created and covers 412 square miles.

January 28, 1819, SIMPSON County was created from Allen County, Logan County and Warren County and was named in honor of John Simpson, military captain killed at the Battle of Frenchtown. Cities and towns located in the county include Franklin, Gold City, Middleton, Prices Mill, Providence, Salmons and Rapids. Simpson County was the 63rd county created and covers 236 square miles.

February 6, 1819, OWEN County was created from Scott County, Franklin County, Gallatin County and Pendleton County and was named in honor of Abraham Owen (1769–1811), killed at the Battle of Tippecanoe. Cities and towns located in the county include Gratz, Monterey and Owenton. Owen County was the 62nd county created and covers 354 square miles.

December 30, 1819, TODD County was created from Christian County and Logan County and was named in honor of John Todd (1750–1782), military colonel killed at the Battle of Blue Licks. Cities and towns located in the county include Allensville, Elkton, Penicktown, Fairview, Clifty, Daysville, Guthrie, Kirkmansville, Sharon Grove, Trenton, Pea Ridge, Allegre, Claymour and Tiny Town.  Todd County was the 64th county created and covers 376 square miles.1820
January 19, 1820, MONROE County was created from Barren County and Cumberland County and was named in honor of James Monroe, President of the United States (1817–1825). Cities and towns located in the county include Fountain Run, Gamaliel and Tompkinsville. Monroe County was the 65th county created and covers 331 square miles.

January 27, 1820, TRIGG County was created from Christian County and Caldwell County and was named in honor of Stephen Trigg (1744–1782), military colonel killed at the Battle of Blue Licks. Cities and towns located in the county include Cadiz, Cerulean, Wallonia, Canton and Rockcastle. Trigg County was the 66th county created and covers 421 square miles.

February 12, 1820, GRANT County was created from Pendleton County and was named in honor of Samuel Grant (1762–1789 or 1794), John Grant (1754–1826), and Squire Grant (1764–1833), three of the county’s earliest settlers. Cities and towns located in the county include Corinth, Crittenden, Dry Ridge and Williamstown. Grant County was the 67th county created and covers 259 square miles.

November 2, 1820, PERRY County was created from Clay County and Floyd County and was named in honor of Oliver Hazard Perry (1785–1819), Admiral in the War of 1812. Cities and towns located in the county include Buckhorn, Cornettsville, Hazard, Vicco, Saul, Ary and Viper. Perry County was the 68th county created in Kentucky and covers 341 square miles.1821
December 14, 1821, LAWRENCE County was created from Floyd County and Greenup County and was named in honor of James Lawrence (1781–1813), naval commander during the War of 1812. Cities and towns located in the county include Blaine and Louisa. Lawrence County was the 69th county created and covers 420 square miles.

December 19, 1821, PIKE County was created from Floyd County and was named in honor of Zebulon Pike (1779–1813), western explorer and discoverer of Pike’s Peak. Cities and towns located in the county include Cedarville, Coal Run Village, Elkhorn City, Mouthcard, Phelps, Pikeville and South Williamson. Pike County was the 70th county created and covers 789 square miles.

December 19, 1821, HICKMAN County was created from Caldwell County and Livingston County. (Although Hickman was created in 1821, county administration didn’t become effective until 1822). Currently the county was named in honor of Paschal Hickman, military captain killed at the Battle of Frenchtown. Cities and towns located in the county include Clinton and Columbus. Hickman County was the 71st county created and covers 245 square miles.

December 19, 1821, GRAVES County was created from Hickman County and was named in honor of Benjamin F. Graves (1771–1813), army major killed at the Battle of Frenchtown. Cities and towns located in the county include Dukedom, Mayfield, Water Valley, Wingo, Fancy Farm, Farmington, Symsonia, Lowes, Kaler and West Viola. Graves County was the 75th county created and covers 557 square miles.

1822
November 3, 1822, CALLOWAY County was created from Hickman County and was named in honor of Richard Callaway (1717–1780), pioneer. Cities and towns located in the county include Hazel and Murray. Calloway County was the 72nd county created and covers 386 square miles.

December 7, 1822, MORGAN County was created from Floyd County and Bath County and was named in honor of Daniel Morgan (1736–1802), Revolutionary War General. Cities and towns located in the county include West Liberty, Cannel City, Crockett, Ezel and Wrigley. Morgan County was the 73rd county created and covers 382 square miles.1823
December 15, 1823, OLDHAM County was created from Henry County, Shelby County and Jefferson County and was named in honor of William Oldham (1753–1791), Revolutionary War Colonel. Oldham County was the 74th county created and covers 190 square miles.

December 17, 1823, MEADE County was created from Hardin County and Breckinridge County and was named in honor of James Meade, military captain killed at the Battle of Frenchtown. Cities and towns located in the county include Brandenburg, Ekron, Muldraugh, Guston, Flaherty, Payneville and Battletown. Meade County was the 76th county created and covers 305 square miles.1824
January 7, 1824, SPENCER County was created from Shelby County, Bullitt County and Nelson County and was named in honor of Spears Spencer, military captain killed at the Battle of Tippecanoe. Cities and towns located in the county include Little Mount, Mount Eden, Rivals, Taylorsville, Waterford, Whitfield and Yoder. Spencer County was the 77th county created and covers 193 square miles.1825
January 12, 1825, EDMONSON County was created from Grayson County, Hart County and Warren County and was named in honor of John Edmonson (1764–1813), military captain killed at the Battle of Frenchtown. Cities and towns located in the county include Brownsville and Rocky Hill. Edmonson County was the 79th county created and covers 302 square miles.

January 15, 1825, McCRACKEN County was created from Hickman County and was named in honor of Virgil McCracken, military captain killed at the Battle of Frenchtown. Cities and towns located in the county include Hendron, Lone Oak, Massac, Paducah, Reidlanda and Woodlawn-Oakdale. McCracken County was the 78th county created and covers 251 square miles. 

December 14, 1825, RUSSELL County was created from Cumberland County, Adair County and Wayne County and was named in honor of William Russell (1758–1825), pioneer and state legislator. Cities and towns located in the county include Jamestown, Russell Springs and Creelsboro. Russell County was the 81st county created and covers 250 square miles.

December 21, 1825, LAUREL County was created from Whitley County, Clay County, Knox County and Rockcastle County and was named for the Mountain laurel trees that are prominent in the area. Cities and towns located in the county include East Bernstadt, London and North Corbin. Laurel County was the 80th county created and covers 434 square miles.

1827
January 16, 1827, ANDERSON County was created from Franklin County, Mercer County and Washington County and was named in honor of Richard Clough Anderson, Jr., Kentucky and United States legislator (1817–1821). Cities and towns located in the county include Glensboro and Lawrenceburg. Anderson County was the 82nd county created in Kentucky and covers 204 square miles.

1829
January 3, 1829, HANCOCK County was created from Daviess County, Ohio County and Breckinridge County and was named in honor of John Hancock (1737–1793), signer of the Declaration of Independence. Cities and towns located in the county include Hawesville and Lewisport. Hancock County was the 83rd county created and covers 189 square miles.

1834
January 25, 1834, MARION County was created from Washington County and was named in honor of Francis Marion (1732–1795), Revolutionary War General. Cities and towns located in the county include Bradfordsville, Lebanon, Loretto, Raywick and Nerinx. Marion County was the 84th county created and covers 347 square miles.

1835
February 20, 1835, CLINTON County was created from Wayne County and Cumberland County. Currently the county was named in honor of DeWitt Clinton, Governor of New York (1817–1823). Cities and towns located in the county include Albany. Clinton County was the 85th county created and covers 196 square miles.

1837
February 9, 1837, TRIMBLE County was created from Henry County, Oldham County and Gallatin County and was named in honor of Robert Trimble, Associate Supreme Court Justice (1826–1828). Cities and towns located in the county include Bedford, Locust, Milton, Wise’s Landing. Trimble County was the 86th county created and covers 146 square miles.1838
February 9, 1838, CARROLL County was created from Gallatin County, Henry County and Trimble County and was named in honor of Charles Carroll (1737–1832), last living signer of the Declaration of Independence. Cities and towns located in the county include Carrollton, English, Ghent, Prestonville, Sanders and Worthville. Carroll County was the 87th county created and covers 130 square miles.

April 10, 1838, CARTER County was created from Greenup County and Lawrence County and was named in honor of William Grayson Carter, Kentucky State Senator (1834–1838). Cities and towns located in the county include Denton, Grahn, Grayson, Olive Hill and part of Rush. Carter County was the 88th county created in Kentucky and covers 397 square miles.

1839
February 8, 1839, BREATHITT County was created from Clay County, Estill County and Perry County and was named in honor of John Breathitt, 11th Governor of Kentucky (1832–1834).  Cities and towns located in the county include Jackson. Breathitt County was the 89th county created in Kentucky and covers 494 square miles.

1840
January 29, 1840, KENTON County was created from Campbell County and was named in honor of Simon Kenton (1755–1836), pioneer. Cities and towns located in the county include Bromley, Covington, Crescent Springs, Crestview Hills, Edgewood, Elsmere, Erlanger, Fairview, Fort Mitchell, Fort Wright, Independence, Kenton Vale, Lakeside Park, Latonia Lakes, Ludlow, Park Hills, Ryland Heights, Taylor Mill, Villa Hills and Visalia. Kenton County was the 90th county created in Kentucky and covers 163 square miles.1842
February 15, 1842, BALLARD County was created from Hickman County and McCracken County and was named in honor of Bland Ballard (1761–1853), hero of the Battle of Fallen Timbers and Battle of River Raisin. Cities and towns located in the county include Bandana, Barlow, Blandville, Kevil, La Center, Monkey’s Eyebrow and Wickliffe. Ballard County was the 93rd county created and covers 254 square miles.

February 15, 1842, BOYLE County was created from Lincoln County and Mercer County and was named in honor of John Boyle, Chief Justice of the Kentucky Court of Appeals (1810–1826). Cities and towns located in the county include Danville, Junction City, Perryville and Parksville. Boyle County was the 94th county created in Kentucky and covers 182 square miles.

March 3, 1842, LETCHER County was created from Perry County and Harlan County and was named in honor of Robert P. Letcher, 15th Governor of Kentucky (1840–1844). Cities and towns located in the county include Blackey, Fleming-Neon, Jenkins, McRoberts and Whitesburg. Letcher County was the 95th county created and covers 339 square miles.

April 1, 1842, CRITTENDEN County was created from Livingston County and was named in honor of John Jordan Crittenden, 17th Governor of Kentucky. (1848–1850) Cities and towns located in the county include Dycusburg and Marion. Crittenden County was the 91st county created and covers 360 square miles.

June 1, 1842, MARSHALL County was created from Calloway County and was named in honor of John Marshall, Chief Justice of the United States Supreme Court (1801–1835). Cities and towns located in the County include Benton, Calvert City, Hardin and Possum Trot. Marshall County was the 92nd county created and covers 304 square miles.1843
January 23, 1843, OWSLEY County was created from Clay County, Estill County and Breathitt County. Currently the county was named in honor of William Owsley, Kentucky Secretary of State and later Governor of Kentucky (1844–1848). Cities and towns located in the county include Booneville. Owsley County was the 96th county created in Kentucky and covers 198 square miles.

February 24, 1843, JOHNSON County was created from Floyd County, Morgan County and Lawrence County and was named in honor of Richard Mentor Johnson, Vice President of the United States (1837–1841). Cities and towns located in the county include Boonscamp, Collista, Denver, East Point, Flat Gap, Hager Hill, Leander, Meally, Oil Springs, Paintsville, Riceville, Staffordsville, Stambaugh, Swamp Branch, Thealka, Tutor Key, Van Lear, West Van Lear, Whitehouse, Williamsport and Wittensville. Johnson County was the 97th county created and covers 264 square miles.

March 4, 1843, LARUE County was created from Hardin County and was named in honor of John Larue (1746–1792), one of the county’s original settlers and the grandfather of Governor John L. Helm. Cities and towns located in the county include Athertonville, Buffalo, Hodgenville, Lyons, Magnolia, Mt. Sherman and Upton – (partly in Hardin County). Larue County was the 98th county created and covers 263 square miles. 1845
January 15, 1845, FULTON County was created from Hickman County and was named in honor of Robert Fulton (1765–1815), inventor of the first commercially successful steamboat. Cities and towns located in the county include Fulton, Hickman. Cities and towns located in the county include Fulton and Hickman. Fulton County was the 99th county created in Kentucky and covers 211 square miles.

1848
March 1, 1848, TAYLOR County was created from Green County and was named in honor of Zachary Taylor, President of the United States (1849–1850). Cities and towns located in the county include Acton, Bengal, Black Gnat, Campbellsville, Elk Horn, Finley, Hatcher, Hobson, Mannsville, Merrimac, Saloma and Yuma. Taylor County was the 100th county created and covers 270 square miles.1852
January 7, 1852, POWELL County was created from Clark County, Estill County and Montgomery County and was named in honor of Lazarus Whitehead Powell, 19th Governor of Kentucky (1851–1855). Cities and towns located in the county include Clay City, Stanton and Slade. Powell County was the 101st county created and covers 180 square miles. 1854
January 14, 1854, LYON County was created from Caldwell County and was named in honor of Chittenden Lyon, United States Representative from Kentucky (1827–1835). Cities and towns located in the county include Eddyville and Kuttawa. Lyon County was the 102nd county created and covers 209 square miles.

January 28, 1854, McLEAN County was created from Muhlenberg County, Daviess County and Ohio County and was named in honor of Alney McLean (1815–1817; 1819–1821), United States Representative from Kentucky. Cities and towns located in the county include Calhoun, Livermore, Sacramento, Island, Beech Grove, Rumsey, Comer, Congleton, Wrightsburg, Elba, Poverty, Cleopatra, Lemon, Wyman, Pack, Semiway, Poplar Grove, Guffie, Buel, Nuckols, Livia, Glenville and Buttonsberry. McLean County was the 103rd county created and covers 256 square miles.1856
May 1, 1856, ROWAN County was created from Fleming County and Morgan County and was named in honor of John Rowan, Congressman from Kentucky (1809–1811; 1825–1831). Cities and towns located in the county include Lakeview Heights, Morehead, Clearfield, Farmers, Elliotville, Haldeman and Sharkey. Rowan County was the 104th county created in Kentucky and covers 282 square miles.

1858
February 2, 1858, JACKSON County was created from Rockcastle County, Owsley County, Madison County, Clay County, Estill County and Laurel County and was named in honor of Andrew Jackson, President of the United States (1829–1837). Cities and towns located in the county include Annville, McKee and Tyner. Jackson County was the 105th county created and covers 346 square miles. 1860
February 16, 1860, BOYD County was created from Carter County, Lawrence County and Greenup County and was named in honor of Linn Boyd, United States Congressman (1835–1837; 1839–1855) and Lieutenant Governor of Kentucky (1859). Cities and towns located in the county include Ashland, Cannonsburg, Catlettsburg, Coalton, Ironville, Meads, Princess, Rockdale, Rush, Summit and Westwood. Boyd County was the 107th county created in Kentucky and covers 160 square miles.

February 22, 1860, MAGOFFIN County was created from Floyd County, Johnson County and Morgan County and was named in honor of Beriah Magoffin, 21st Governor of Kentucky (1859–1862). Cities and towns located in the county include Salyersville, Royalton and Elsie. Magoffin County was the 108th county created and covers 310 square miles.

March 5, 1860, WOLFE County was created from Owsley County, Breathitt County, Powell County and Morgan County and was named in honor of Nathaniel Wolfe (1808–1865), member of the Kentucky General Assembly.  Cities and towns located in the county include Bethany, Campton, Hazel Green, Lee City, Pine Ridge, Trent, Bear Pin and Mary Flatt Road. Wolfe County was the 110th county created in Kentucky and covers 223 square miles.

May 1, 1860, METCALFE County was created from Barren County, Monroe County, Adair County, Cumberland County and Green County and was named in honor of Thomas Metcalfe, 10th Governor of Kentucky (1828–1832). Cities and towns located in the county include Edmonton, Summer Shade, Randolph, Center, Knob Lick, Beaumont, Sulpher Well and Savoyard. Metcalfe County was the 106th county created and covers 291 square miles.

July 1, 1860, WEBSTER County was created from Hopkins County, Union County and Henderson County and was named in honor of Daniel Webster, U.S. Senator from Massachusetts and United States Secretary of State (1841–1843; 1850–1852). Cities and towns located in the county include Clay, Dixon, Providence, Sebree, Slaughters and Wheatcroft. Webster County was the 109th county created and covers 336 square miles.1867
August 1, 1867, ROBERTSON County was created from Bracken County, Nicholas County, Harrison County and Mason County and was named in honor of George Robertson, chief justice of the Kentucky court of appeals (1828–1843). Cities and towns located in the County include Kentontown, Mount Olivet and Piqua. Robertson County was the 111th county created and covers 100 square miles.

August 1, 1867, BELL County was created from Knox County and Harlan County and was named in honor of Joshua Fry Bell, Kentucky legislator (1862–1867). Cities and towns located in the county include Middlesborough, and Pineville. Bell County was the 112th county created and covers 361 square miles.1869
April 1, 1869, ELLIOTT County was created from Carter County, Lawrence County and Morgan County and was named in honor of John Milton Elliott (1820–1885), U.S. Representative from Kentucky. Cities and towns located in the county include Ault, Bascom, Beartown, Bell City, Bigstone, Blaines Trace, Bruin, Brushy Fork, Burke, Clay Fork, Cliffside, Culver, Dewdrop, Dobbins, Edsel, Eldridge, Fannin, Fannin Valley, Faye, Fielden, Forks of Newcombe, Gimlet, Gomez, Green, Halcom, Ibex, Isonville, Little Fork, Little Sandy, Lytten, Middle Fork, Neil Howard’s Creek, Newcombe, Newfoundland, Ordinary, Roscoe, Shady Grove, Sandy Hook, Sarah, Sideway, Spanglin, Stark, Stephens, The Ridge, Wells Creek and Wyatt. Elliott County was the 114th county created and covers 234 square miles.

May 29, 1869, MENIFEE County was created from Powell County, Wolfe County, Bath County, Morgan County and Montgomery County and was named in honor of Richard H. Menefee, United States Congressman from Kentucky (1837–1839).  Cities and towns located in the county include Denniston, Frenchburg, Korea, Mariba, Means, Pomeroyton, Scranton, Sudith and Wellington. Menifee County was the 113th county created in Kentucky and covers 203 square miles. 1870
March 1, 1870, LEE County was created from Owsley County, Breathitt County, Wolfe County and Estill County and was named in honor of Henry “Light Horse Harry” Lee, Revolutionary War hero and Governor of Virginia. Cities and towns located in the county include Beattyville. Lee County was the 115th county created in Kentucky and covers 211 square miles.

September 1, 1870, MARTIN County was created from Lawrence County, Floyd County, Pike County and Johnson County. Currently the county was named in honor of John P. Martin, United States Congressman from Kentucky (1845–1847). Cities and towns located in the county include Inez and Warfield. Martin County was the 116th county created and covers 231 square miles. 1878
March 29, 1878, LESLIE County was created from Clay County, Harlan County and Perry County and was named in honor of Preston Leslie, 26th Governor of Kentucky (1871–1875). Cities and towns located in the county include Hyden, Stinnett, Wooton, Hoskinston, Hell for Certain. Leslie County was the 117th county created and covers 412 square miles. 1884
May 5, 1884, KNOTT County was created from Perry County, Breathitt County, Floyd County and Letcher County and was named in honor of James Proctor Knott, 29th Governor of Kentucky (1883–1887). Cities and towns located in the county include Hindman, Pippa Passes and Hollybush. Knott County was the 118th county created and covers 352 square miles. 1886
May 3, 1886, CARLISLE County was created from Hickman County and was named in honor of John G. Carlisle, United States legislator (1877–1889) and Speaker of the U.S. House of Representatives. Cities and towns located in the county include Arlington and Bardwell. Carlisle County was the 119th county created in Kentucky, the last county created in the 19th century and covers 191 square miles. 1912
March 12, 1912, McCREARY County was created from parts of Wayne County, Pulaski County and Whitley County and was named in honor of James McCreary, thirty-seventh Governor of Kentucky (1912–1916). Cities and towns located in the county include Pine Knot, Stearns and Whitley City. McCreary County was the last county created, the only county created in the 20th century and covers 427 square miles.In 1939 there was a small adjustment to the Metcalfe and Cumberland county lines.